PubChem Announcements



April 9, 2015
The PubChem Substance Record page is now available. It replaces the PubChem Substance Summary page. Similar to the recent update to the PubChem Compound Summary page, this page was given a substantial makeover. Detailed information on the new PubChem Substance Record page is provided in the PubChem Blog.
October 20, 2014
A revamped PubChem Compound Summary page is now available. Technology has advanced considerably since the last major update in 2011, so this page was given a substantial makeover. Detailed information on the new PubChem Compound Summary page is provided in the PubChem Blog.
September 16, 2014
PubChem celebrates 10 years of service to the chemical biology community! With humble beginnings, PubChem was first launched in Sep. 16, 2004. Through this time, PubChem’s focus has remained the same: to provide comprehensive information on the biological activities of chemical substances. To read more about this, visit the PubChem Blog.
July 25, 2014
Why contribute your data to PubChem? Maximize the impact of your research. Crosslink your data to key scientific databases. Satisfy data sharing requirements by journals and funding agencies. Flexibility on when your data gets released. Ability to share on-hold data with reviewers and collaborators. To learn more about these, visit the PubChem Blog.
June 26, 2014
Just over 1.4 million structures from Collaborative Drug Discovery (CDD) are now available in PubChem, including almost 94,000 novel structures. These structures have links back to CDD’s public Vault data pages, many of which hold structure-activity data and compound properties, and are accessible through a free login. The announcement from CDD provides additional details.
January 30, 2014
PubChemRDF is released. It allows PubChem data to be used with semantic web technologies and encodes PubChem information using the Resource Description Framework (RDF). PubChemRDF data can be accessed through a REST interface or bulk downloaded from the PubChem FTP site. One benefit of RDF formatted data is the ability to use schema-less databases (such as a triplestore or a graph database) to import, query, and analyze PubChem data locally. Read the PubChem Blog (http://1.usa.gov/1db9Y4T) to learn more.
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